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Join us at the International Terminology Summer School 2017 in Cologne

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International Terminology Summer School 2012: Register now!

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This year again te International Terminology Summer School (TSS 2012) will take place at the University of Vienna, from 9 to 13 July 2012, jointly organized by TermNet, the International Network for Terminology, and the Center for Translation Studies.

TSS is a practice-oriented one-week training course on terminology management. TSS is intended for practitioners, students, scientists who are looking for a comprehensive, state-of-the-art introduction to terminology theory and practice.

TSS gives the opportunity to the participants to network and discuss in a relaxed and resourceful environment with peers and colleagues during the side events planned for this purpose. Enjoy the Terminology Breakfasts every morning before classes, participant in the “get to know each other” event on Monday after the first day of classes. Meet your colleagues in the different “after school” events during the week.

Register now for the TSS2012 and take profit of the exclusive advantages of this very international training: http://www.termnet.org/english/events/tss_2012/registration.php

For further information on TSS 2012, please see: http://www.termnet.org/english/events/tss_2012/index.php
or contact events@termnet.org

Terminology Summer School 2010 in Vienna – Registration open

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As from now on you can register for the upcoming International Terminology Summer School. The training week will take place in Vienna in the last week of May (24-28 May 2010).

Here’s the link: http://www.termnet.org/english/events/tss2010

How the state of the world economy impacts our professions

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Something we discussed last week with a few experts in “language-related professions” was about what the future will bring for us terminologists, translators, localizers, technical writers, etc. There is some indication that our field has not been hit as hard as others. Participation at our TSS 2009 training was nearly unaffected, for example. We also learned from Frieda Steurs during her presentations that the industry is growing.

But is this all that is to say? I mean, have we really weathered the economic crisis unharmed? Is it because what an expert said because in times of crisis companies concentrate particularly on the strategic improvement of quality and internal processes? More importantly, would they invest in this in times when cost-cutting is the word of the day?

Or may it be that recession is yet to hit us as – it is predicted to do with so many other industries – with a certain time lag?

I would be curious what you think about it. Your comments please!

It’s over – but not over yet!

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TSS 2009 has closed doors for this year today. We think that it was just great! We wish all the participants a good trip back home. Nevertheless, we will all keep in touch. Here’s again our invitation to you all to join in the various discussions in this blog. Post your questions, feedback, suggestions for new topics etc.
Remember: you are TSS!

Copyright for the terminologist

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Most translators and terminologists are at onepoint or another in their career concerned with the problem of copyright. It is therefore useful to know some basics on intellectual property. The International Information Centre for Terminology (INFOTERM) has published a small booklet on this issue which is available in English and German via TermNet Publisher: Guidelines for Terminology Agreements

Here are a few tipps Sue Ellen Wright presented during TSS 2009. They should give you some idea. However, if you plan some bigger project it is advisable to consult a legal adviser in your country.

  • Fair use and your termbase
    • Purpose and character: For educational or scholarly purposes
    • Nature of the copyrighted work: Creative work or informational?
    • Amount and substantiality: Minimal excerpts with citations
    • Effect on potential market for protected work: Basically non-commercial
    • Problems arise if you want to market or share your resources
  • Copyrightabilty of Terminology According to Data Category
  • Not covered:
    • Terms and symbols never covered
    • Definitions and descriptive texts
    • US: usable under fair use   practice
    • But “fair use” disappears under the European law
  • Possibly covered:
    • Compilation component & linkages
    • Database component under sui generis provisions
    • Content not covered
  • Data type concerns:
    • Photos and drawings or parts thereof definitely are covered
    • Some types of formulas are covered

View the full PRESENTATION on the TermNet Website

From Terminologies to Ontologies

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A very comprehensive reader on knowledge organization, terminologies, ontologies by Gerhard Budin of Vienna University as it was held yesterday at TSS 2009 has been uploaded on the TermNet Website for information and discussion.

Economic issues for terminology

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Knowledge is the wealth of any company. This why it is so important to manage the representations of all the concepts that consitue this knowledge. Terminology management, therefore, is an important economic factor. Terminologists are aware of this, of course. But they have to argue again and again with their managers, superiors or other decision makers, who may not (yet) understand why an investment in terminology management is an investment on quality, cost saving and improved overall performance.

We are discussing economic aspects of terminology at TSS 2009 in a presentation by Frieda Steurs, which is spiked with many real-life examples from business and industry.

This is essential knowledge for every good terminology managers. It will help to defend their position and improve their visibility within organizations.

Go to PRESENTATION for the arguments. Have more arguments? Your colleagues all over the world will be grateful for you sharing them here!

Some online terminology resources

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If you are looking for reliable terms and definitions for subject fileds as varied as musical styles, weird hobbies, legal issues or rare diseases or in other than the “usual” languages covered in the Web (like English, Spanish, French) …here you might find the right link below.

Webterm. Terminology collection in large number of subject fields by the Cologne University of Applied Sciences: http://www.termportal.de

Eurotermbank. Although EuroTermBank is addressed directly towards Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, and Poland, the project is open to other new EU member states and interested countries and organizations outside EU. It will also enable exchange of terminology data with existing national and EU terminology databases by establishing cooperative relationships, aligning methodologies and standards, designing and implementing data exchange mechanisms and procedures. http://www.eurotermbank.com

IATE: The European Union’s multilingual term bank. Particularly rich in technical and specialized terminology related to European Union policies

http://iate.europa.eu

You know of more valuable sites? We are collecting!

What to do when you have to create a glossary

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UPDATE!

The “glossaries” focus group reports what they did:

Essentially, we introduced ourselves to each other and as we did this, established the various frameworks in which different members of the group create different kinds of glossaries and other terminological resources.

Environments, glossary types, target groups

  • Resources designed to respond to distributed development in large enterprises; problem of communication among distributed sites;  getting clear definitions in English
  • Resources designed for the purpose of translating EU legislation based on multilingual glossaries with master en equivalents (languages: Croatian & Turkish)
  • Regulatory affairs in order to support translation activities by outsourced translators
  • Language planning in the context of the Welsh language boards; Welsh/English; issues of acceptance and term creation
  • Fachsprache= special language in business; (English and Slovenian) for use by freelance translators
  • Bilingual lexicology for special languages
  • WIPO terminology database
  • Transportation industry; dictionaries and glossaries for Latvian, Russian, English; how to make the terminologies parallel
  • Translation department glossaries for EU agencies in a wide range of domains; how to foresee problems and solutions for translators, auditors, interpreters, etc.
  • Freelance technical writer: glossaries; technical solutions
  • Technology companies where people are creating terms in industry and business
  • Technical terms, medical terms, processes to establish preferred terminological usage
  • South African experience: language planning and term introduction in languages for which many terms must be created
  • Translation unit of the eu: exercise in the combination of various different glossaries into Euroterm; problem of legacy data; problem of unification of entries
  • Communications support – total communications management for translation and document production
  • Technical translation and terminology management for enterprises, multiple languages
  • Modernization of legacy systems and importation of legacy data
  • Secretary to a commission in a minority language region; translation of legal terms & laws into a minority language that is a majority language in a neighboring country (i.e., German in Belgium, parallel)
  • WIPO – World Intellectual Property Organization; patent translation and terminology management

Problems

  • How does one transfer terminological and lexicographical information from tabular Excel glossaries into a structured terminology management system, such as MultiTerm? (Answer: xml output, manipulation and importation into the master system; more of a tools question, but nevertheless related to “glossaries”. Similar issues exist for glossaries found on the web, which may also need to edited for stylistic presentation.
  • How does one deal with copyright issues? (To be discussed on Thursday)
  • How do we come with new terms in different environments:
  • Terms used in well established languages (e.g., German terms for Italian or Belgian law)?
  • Terms or even general language words for use in languages where some areas of science, law, etc. have not been as rigorously developed in the past
  • How do we introduce and educate the general public so that terms created in such environments will be accepted for general usage?
  • Community action procedures and introduction in the school system in order to familiar children, families and interest groups in focused areas of terminology (e.g., family health, water management, childhood education, etc.), with the result that the introduction and acceptance of terminology can actually take a generation!
  • How do we deal with the fact that terms are coined in English and tend to be both very compact and short, in addition to being ambiguous with regard to noun/verb/adjective relationships, when some languages require more explicit, longer phrasal terms?
  • How do we keep people from just giving up and using the English terms?

No clear solutions here, but we commiserated with each other!

Critical insight: “Nothing is so easy as I thought it would be.”

To be continued tomorrow…

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